Skip to main content

Trying Gnome Boxes 3.16.2 on Fedora 22

Fedora 23 on Gnome Boxes screenshot
Fedora 23 Rawhide within Gnome Boxes

Gnome Boxes is an application similar to VirtualBox that allows installing a operating systems via virtualization or use it remotely. The main focus is the simplicity to casual users wanting to try their system.  One of new features is the ability to do an express installation with minimal interaction which is convenient for a quick setup for say Microsoft Windows system up to 8.1.

One of weakness is the lack of transferring data within the virtualizer as done on VirtualBox useful to do the work on format not supported by applications on Linux distribution notable Fedora which is my main system. On some occasion, Boxes will not detect the existing virtualized system I installed on the main session until the restart. It can be annoying but not enough to detract the experience.

Overall, Gnome Boxes is a very useful tool for developers and also designers wanting to run their operating system without dual boot. The test was done on ASUS X550ZE laptop.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Sun's promise to open source Java vs GCJ

According to this Press Release via OS News , it appears Sun Microsystems allow the redistribution of their Java development for Linux distributions under a new license called Operation System Distributor's License for Java or in short "Distro License for Java". Currently, only binaries are licensed as the source code is not available for the public although SUN promise to open source Java . I wonder if that announcement will affect the whole GCJ on which Fedora Project is focusing. Pour les francophones: Selon cette note de presse via OS News, Sun Microsystems permet la redistribution des binaires Java pour les distribution de Linux sous la nouvelle license nomm&ecaute;e License des distros pour Java . Je me demande si cette annonce affectera le développement de GCJ.

Using AMD RX Vega driver OpenCL on Fedora 29

The Raven Ridge APU is very capable processor to handle OpenCL inside some applications like Blender, Darktable and Gimp. Unfortunately, the current implementation from Mesa, clover, stuck to 1.3, is not supported. AMD released their driver 18.40 with OpenCL2.0+ targeting only Red Hat Enterprise Linux/Cent OS 6.10 and 7.5 in addition of Ubuntu LTS. The good new is the former rpm format can be used on Fedora. The graphical part of Raven Ridge is Vega 8, basically a cut-down of Vega56 or Vega64 meaning choosing either driver for RX Vega . The instruction is provided for extracting the rpm files but here is  some requirements for OpenCL: kernel-devel (provided by Fedora repository) amdgpu-dkms dkms libopencl-amdgpu-pro opencl-amdgpu-pro-icd Once done, applications needing OpenCL will automatically detect the driver located on /opt/amdgpu/lib64 . Blender will list as unknown AMD GPU and Darktable will enable it. OpenCL from official AMD driver enabled on Darktable Ra

Detailing the installation of AMD OpenCL rpm for Fedora

Revisiting the previous blog and freshly reinstalling Fedora Design Suite due to a busted boot, I look at the official guideline from AMD Driver for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 and write a way to improve the process of installing on Fedora 29 in this example. Extracting the tarball contains the following: amdgpu-install amdgpu-pro-install symlink to amdgpu doc folder repodata folder RPMS folder containing rpm package Executing the command ./amdgpu-install -opencl=pal --headless sadly failed on Fedora on that line: ./amdgpu-install -y --opencl=pal --headless Last metadata expiration check: 0:30:51 ago on Mon 19 Nov 2018 07:13:43 PM PST. No match for argument: amdgpu Upon closer look, the script failed to created a temporary repository on /var/opt/amdgpu-pro-local probably explaining why amdgpu metapackage name failed to display. Someone should investigate and provide a fix. At least, we find out Fedora support is available but unofficial. Due to its design, Gnome